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SPIDER SEASON
(Cold River Press, 2016)

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The Audience
(Uptown Books, 2007)
Out of print

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Susan Kelly-DeWitt’s Greatest Hits
(Kattywompus Press, 2003)

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To A Small Moth
(Poet’s Corner Press, 2001)
Out of print

A Camellia for Judy
(Frith Press, 1998)
Out of print

 

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The Fortunate Islands
(Marick Press, 2008)

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Cassiopeia Above the Banyan Tree
(Rattlesnake Press, 2007)

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The Land
(Rattlesnake Press, 2005)

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The Book of Insects
(Spruce Street Press, 2003)
Out of print

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Feather’s Hand,
(Swan Scythe Press, 2000)
Out of print

 

The Fortunate Islands

These poems take pleasure in the multiplicity of things—“each blossom shakes/ out the night’s wet mix// of stars and dark”—whatever personal loss or change. Their power is in their spiritual longing. They are graceful, so accurate and deep in their discernment—I have different favorites with every reading. – Dennis Schmitz, author of Truth Squad

Susan Kelly-DeWitt breaks our hearts and puts them together again with words. She extends our palpable sense of the child at the mercy of the loved, feared, drunken father made flesh by Roethke’s poem. Here, we are undefended—no fun with this father—we are inside the child’s fear. As we must, we recoil from the alcoholic father; but like his daughter, we also empathize and pity him: “…it will seem to those who love him/that some invisible shrapnel festers his soul.” Like her, we wonder “What was it that tore/his insides?” Finally, we too are freed by her dream wish of the Feather River’s rising “to lift/his cumbersome skiff/into the open sea.” Susan Kelly-DeWitt follows Ptolemy, choosing to run her prime meridian, her original orientation, through the Fortunate Islands, where “the past seems far away// I can cross the wooden bridge/in either direction.” And illuminated along the way by her stunning imagery, her brilliant conjunctions of language, art, personal history, we hasten to follow her. – Carole Simmons Oles, author of Waking the Stone

These poems are sure-footed, engaging, broad in subject matter but grounded in the poet’s wary detective-mind. I have a strong feeling for the most “psychological” of the poems, and those with psychological twists in the last stanza. The poems in this collection feel emotionally complete. – Sandra McPherson, author of Expectation Days

 

The Book of Insects

I’m glad Frith Press has brought out the few poems that are packaged in this unassuming chapbook. As if following the dictum of William Carlos Williams, “No ideas but in things,” Kelly-DeWitt’s poems show so much in a few lines – a scene, an epiphany, a deeply felt emotion. They also share the craft and erudition, as well as the empathy and compassion, of Kelly-DeWitt’s teacher Denise Levertov. Perhaps their humility comes from being rooted in a place whose time has not yet come. And that may be a good thing. They are not full of themselves. – Carol Frith, Poetry Now

 

A Camellia for Judy

I’m glad Frith Press has brought out the few poems that are packaged in this unassuming chapbook. As if following the dictum of William Carlos Williams, “No ideas but in things,” Kelly-DeWitt’s poems show so much in a few lines – a scene, an epiphany, a deeply felt emotion. They also share the craft and erudition, as well as the empathy and compassion, of Kelly-DeWitt’s teacher Denise Levertov. Perhaps their humility comes from being rooted in a place whose time has not yet come. And that may be a good thing. They are not full of themselves. – Jane Blue, The Montserrat Review

 

The Land

Susan Kelly-DeWitt is a poet of natural nouns; she points directly at things — flowers and trees, animals and insects; grandmothers and Iron Age murder victims. She uses all the primary colors, and silver, carmine, pink and lemon as well. In this latest book there are mockingbirds, owls, egrets, alligators, wolves, rats, lizards and spiders. There are oaks and dogwood, fungi and roses, tulips and cedars. And to all of these Kelly-DeWitt brings her precise, scientist-like descriptions…….she creates by naming what exists in the world around her, observing with empathy and without overt judgment. – James DenBoer, Poetry Now

 

Feather’s Hand

Angels, saints and sages populate these very material, very quotidian, delightful poems, speaking in noisy inner voices the pained, humorous truths of our world. – Marilyn Nelson

 

To A Small Moth

Kelly- DeWitt’s poems remind us, as we must be reminded, that no matter what, a beautiful and timeless world surrounds us; we must take the time to peer into it, but if we have Kelly-DeWitt’s wisdom and willingness, her hard-earned grace and vision, we may be privileged enough to participate in ancient and sacred ways. – Walter Pavlich